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Post World War

 

INTRODUCTION TO POST SECOND WORLD WAR CONFLICTS


During the Second World War 4,364 Signallers lost their lives. With the arrival of peace in Europe it could have reasonably been expected that bloodshed would end. But since 1945 Royal Signals personnel have participated in all of the conflicts involving the nation.

The Corps has provided communications and Information Systems for all three British Forces, United Nations, Allied Troops and NATO forces and Signallers have continued to lay down their lives.
The following pages outline a few of the post-war operations to demonstrate the wide range of Royal Signals participation and the extent of Museum displays and exhibits. They do not claim to be a comprehensive history of the campaigns in question nor do the passages cover all of the campaigns.

For anyone requiring further detail they should refer to the volumes of Corps history or arrange research facilities in the Museum archive and library through the Museum Director.
 

ROYAL SIGNALS IN BRITISH ARMY OF THE RHINE (BAOR)
 

The British Army has served in Germany since the end of the Second World War, first as an Army of occupation then as part of NATO. A large number of Royal Signals personnel have served in Signals units with the British Army of the Rhine. Units from BAOR were on stand-by to move at a moments notice, to go anywhere in the world. Contingents from the Royal Signals in BAOR took part in the Falklands campaign, in the Gulf War and are part of the peace keeping force in Bosnia.

There is a wide range of equipment in the Museum that covers the many years of service in BAOR. The transition from BRUIN, a trunk communications system that followed the chain of command, to PTARMIGAN, the current area communications system is depicted. BRUIN was introduced in 1968 as an ‘interim measure’ to cater for the operational needs of the Cold War years. It was basically an ‘off-the-shelf ‘ buy whilst a true area system was being developed and it lasted for nearly 25 years. PTARMIGAN took 25 years to develop and was operational in 1985.
 

THE FISH FRYER
 

This was officially named the '3/4 Ton Body Comms Equipment'. It was a specially designed covered trailer that could house a variety of equipment. It was air portable and was towed by a Landrover. This shows a C50/R236 Radio Relay Station that was used in the BRUIN system from 1968 to about 1985.

The post-war LARKSPUR range of radios was also introduced 1958 to replace the war-time sets. It was the workhorse range of radios until it was replaced by CLANSMAN in the late 1970s.

There are examples of many other equipments that were used including field telephones, teleprinters, Electronic Warfare and other specialist kit.

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